the low down on new books

Archive for October, 2011

Captive Trail

Reviewed by Brittney

Just the Facts: by Susan Page Davis. 272 p. Published Sept 2011 by Moody Publishers.  Advanced copy provided for review in electronic format, courtesy of the publishers (through NetGalley) in return for my honest opinion.

Verdict: ★★★★

Who Cares? Adult Inspirational Historical Fic

Short Bio (from Amazon):  

The Captive Trail is second in a six-book series about four generations of the Morgan family living, fighting, and thriving amidst a turbulent Texas history spanning from 1845 to 1896.  Although a series, each book can be read on its own.

Taabe Waipu has run away from her Comanche village and is fleeing south in Texas on a horse she stole from a dowry left outside her family’s teepee.  The horse has an accident and she is left on foot, injured and exhausted.  She staggers onto a road near Fort Chadbourne and collapses.

On one of the first runs through Texas, Butterfield Overland Mail Company driver Ned Bright carries two Ursuline nuns returning to their mission station.  They come across a woman who is nearly dead from exposure and dehydration and take her to the mission.

With some detective work, Ned discovers Taabe Waipu identity. He plans to unite her with her family, but the Comanche have other ideas, and the two end up defending the mission station. Through Taabe and Ned we learn the true meaning of healing and restoration amid seemingly powerless situations.

Eyewitness Account:

I picked this up because I liked Lone Star Trail.  The sequel is written by a different author, but had all the same elements I appreciated about the first – interesting historical setting (this time dealing with the Comanche, Texas settlers, and French nuns who had set up a “mission” and school for girls), decent plot, and empathetic characters.  Many children were captured and raised among Native Americans during Westward Expansion, and this story is a compelling snapshot of what such a situation must have felt like to a captive.

Still loving this series, and would recommend it to anyone who likes historical fiction and interested in this era!

Other Books Read by This Author: None.

What are other people saying? Reviews from the Heart, This That and the Other Thing, Sandra Ardoin

Rating:

★★★☆☆ Plot Development

★★★★ Characterization

★★★☆☆ Writing Style

★★★★ Original Idea

★★★★Page Turner

Overall ★★★★


The Book That Made Your World

Reviewed by Brittney

Just the Facts: by Vishal Mangalwadi. 464 p. Published May 2011 by Thomas Nelson.  Advanced copy provided for review in electronic format by the publisher (through NetGalley) in exchange for my honest opinion.

Verdict: ★★★☆☆

Who Cares? Adult Non-Fiction (History, Christianity)

Short Bio: 

Discover how the Bible became the West’s source of human rights, justice, heroism, optimism, compassion, capitalism, family, and morality.

In the 1960s many from the West went to the East in search of spiritual wisdom. The Book That Made Your World reverses the journey. Vishal Mangalwadi, an Indian philosopher, takes readers on a historical journey through the last millennium, exploring why and how the Bible reformed Europe and made the West a uniquely thinking civilization: technical and tolerant, scientific and free, just and prosperous. Readers will learn:

  • Why an American president puts his hand on the Bible to take the oath of a secular office
  • What forced British monarchs from Henry VIII to James I to submit to the Bible’s authority
  • Why Bible translators Wycliffe, Luther, and Tyndale became history’s greatest revolutionaries
  • How the Bible globalized western education

Eyewitness Account: 

This book was a fairly interesting treatise on how the Bible has influenced all aspects of our civilization (for the better).  You’d expect something like this to be written by a someone of Western Judeo-Christian background, but the author is actually a native Indian who writes the book as a response to a national Indian movement claiming that the Western Christian influence impacted India negatively rather than positively. Mangalwadi juxtaposes the kinds of behavior, motives, and priorities that result from the Christian faith with the mindset of those from Buddhist/Hindu faiths.  He covers a rather diverse set of subjects to explore his theory that the best parts of all civilization are the result of Christian influence – the development of science and education, the protection of life and the rights of women, and the liberty and prosperity that characterize the West.

This is one of those books that you kind of get the gist of within the first couple chapters – I found it hard to keep my interest past the second half of the book.  However, it is very well written and very thought-provoking.  Mangalwadi includes some personal anecdotes to make his point about the effect that other worldviews have on a society that are very provocative; the most poignant is one in which a neighbor girl is not only neglected to the point of death, but her parents refuse to let Mangalwadi and his wife offer their free help and resources to nurse her back to health (as a result of a worldview that says life is suffering and everyone has the life they deserve).

If you like history and broad discussion of civilizations, you’ll probably love this book.

Other Books Read by This Author: None.

Notable Quotes:

“When a husband is forbidden extramarital affairs, taking a second wife, or divorcing a difficult wife; when he is not allowed to hate or be harsh with her; when he is required to love and honor his wife; then his wife is empowered.  She has the security to seek her dignity and rights.”

“When we believe truth is unknowable, we rob it of any authority.  What is left is brute power wielding arbitrary force.  Whether a person or an ethnic minority is guilty or innocent becomes irrelevant.  Their right to life depends exclusively on the whims of whoever has power.  Any nation that refuses to live under truth condemns itself to live under sinful man.”

What are other people saying?  Christianity Today, The Biblical BookshelfBreakPoint

Rating:

★★★☆☆ Writing Style

★★★☆☆ Organization

★★★★ Original Idea

★★★☆☆ Page Turner

Overall ★★★☆☆


On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness

Reviewed by Nick 

Just the Facts: by Andrew Peterson. 304 p. Published by WaterBrook Press.

Verdict: ★★★★

Who Cares? Children’s Lit

Short Bio: Three children in the land of Skree soon find that their lives aren’t as boring or simple as they thought. Janner, Tink and Leeli Igiby think that the most exciting thing happening in Skree is the Dragon Festival, but they will soon have close run-ins with several mean-tempered Fangs of Dang, lizard like men that have dominated Skree from across the sea; follow treasure maps, escape the Black Carriage that takes small children back across the sea to who knows what kind of fate awaits them; narrowly miss being eaten by a fearsome toothy cow of Skree, and they will discover the treasures of the kingdom of Anniera.

Eyewitness Account: Andrew Peterson, song and book writer, has a love for adventure and fantasy and a sarcastic twist to his sense of humor. Personally, I see him as an amalgamation of Lemony Snicket and Terry Pratchet. His hallmark is his faith, apparent in the moral message that he gives, perhaps promising an allegorical component to his Windfeather Saga. I enjoyed reading his book. He is not as repetitious as Lemony Snicket, and his writing style suits me well, though he does not have the smoothness of prosody that Pratch has. The only major critique that I would have for Peterson is that he brought his storyline to climax really early in the book and pretty much kept it there throughout the remainder of the book. Don’t forget that a book can have minor climaxes and that denouement and resolution can not only give your reader some time to process what’s going on but can also be a major proponent of character and plot development.        

Other Books Read by This Author:  This is my first book read by this author, but I will definitely be reading the next three books in the Wingfeather Saga.

What are other people saying? Darcy Gudger , Jill Williamson , Ken Reads

Rating:

★★★☆☆ Plot Development

★★★★★ Characterization

★★★★ Writing Style

★★★★★ Original Idea

★★★☆☆ Page Turner

Overall ★★★★